Selena Gomez Releases 'Bad Liar' Single And Bondage Video, But She's not Singing About Justin Bieber

Selena Gomez’s “Bad Liar” single has dropped. Is the aching-for-love ode about former boyfriend, Justin Bieber, or the starlet’s current beau, The Weeknd? As announced, Selena officially released the lead single from her upcoming album on Thursday (May 18). “Bad Liar” follows days of Selena teasing lyrics and visuals at her Instagram and Twitter accounts. The audio is now streaming on Vevo, iTunes, and Spotify. The latter exclusively premiered a music video in which Gomez wears wrist and arm bandages, a medical wristband, and a bondage bow. Incidentally, it’s the first video to be streamed by Spotify. It’s claimed Gomez went to the photo and video shoot straight after being discharged from rehab for her lupus-related rehab stay last summer. Another music video is expected at some point. So, what does “Bad liar” sound like, and who is it about? For starters, the song is as catchy as flu, very cool, and very good. It samples Talking Heads’ 1977 classic hit “Psycho Killer.” This is heard right at the start of the track with the Tina Weymouth-sampled bass line looped. Then the song gets going with a super-minimal beat supplemented by interesting instrumental accents and SelGo’s signature breathy, film noir vocals, as heard on Revival standout “Hands To Myself.” At various points during “Bad Liar,” the 24-year-old songstress can be heard on stacked vocals, breaths, the odd spoken repeat of words, and a small laugh that wraps the song. #BadLiar 5.18 A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on May 16, 2017 at 5:32pm PDT To the song’s subject. The lyrics were sent by Gomez’s team to the Genius.com website on Wednesday. Shortly afterwards, Justin Tranter (one of the single’s co-writers) tweeted that some of the lyrics were incorrectly written on the site.. “You got some of the lyrics wrong,” Tranter tweeted tartly, “and it’s actually about trying to hide magic feelings for someone new, but not being able to. Xo.” Tranter’s clarification was in response to a tweet posted by Genius which claimed “Bad Liar” was about someone trying to get over an ex. You got some of the lyrics wrong, and it’s actually about trying to hide magic feelings for someone new, but not being able to. Xo https://t.co/nL8ooKgdXa — Justin Tranter (@justtranter) May 18, 2017 Now, thanks to Tranter there’s no need to guess who Gomez is singing about on her new song. Based on Selena’s autobiographical Revival album, and songwriter Ryan Tedder’s recent comments about his co-writing sessions with the Latina, she clearly sings about her perspective on her experiences. “I was walking down the street the other day/ Trying to distract myself/But then I see your face/ Oh wait that’s someone else,” Gomez sings as she kicks off her new song. She muses, “Tryna play it coy / Tryna make it disappear / But just like the battle of Troy/ There’s nothing subtle here / In my room there’s a king size space.” Then adds, “Bigger than it used to be / If you want you can rent that place / Call me an amenity / Even if it’s in my dreams.” Bad Liar exclusive spotify video is out NOW!! Link in bio ???? A post shared by @selenaupdates24 on May 17, 2017 at 9:21pm PDT Bearing in mind that the track isn’t about ex-sweetheart Justin Bieber, and noting that the adult SelGo sings about how she feels — “Bad Liar” seems to be her way of telling the world how she felt when she first began to notice The Weeknd (whose real name is Abel Tesfaye). Back in November 2015, Selena and The Weeknd reportedly met each other for the first time at the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show taping in New York City. Both artists performed. At the time, Abel was still dating his then girlfriend, supermodel Bella Hadid. Returning to the lyrics of “Bad Liar,” the pre-hook and chorus finds Selena obsessing over the “taken” object of her desire. Selena sings, “Ooh you’re taking all perfection out my mind / Ooooh every time I watch you serpentine.” In the chorus, she repeats, “I’m tryin’, I’m tryin’, I’m tryin’ I’m tryin’, I’m tryin’ / Oh tryin’, I’m tryin’, I’m tryin’ / I’m tryin’, I’m tryin’ / Not to think about you / No, no, no, no / Not to think about you / No, no, no, no.” The post-chorus payoff delivers with a sharp rhyming couplet, “All my feelings on fire /Guess I’m a bad liar.” Selena Gomez’s ‘Bad Liar’ Nod to ‘Psycho Killer’ Explained: ‘We’re Obsessed with the Talking Heads,’ Says Justin… https://t.co/abcefjTA16 — Variety (@Variety) May 18, 2017 In the second verse, in particular, one see the benefits for pop artists like Gomez in working with such experienced songwriters as Tranter, Julia Michaels (the duo wrote a lot of the key songs on Revival) and Ian Kirkpatrick. The lyrics get even more artsy and zero in on the song’s inner tension, which has the effect of drawing listeners in closer. Gomez sings, “I see how your attention builds / It’s like looking in a mirror / Your touch like a happy pill / But still all we do is fear.” She continues, “What could possibly happen next? / Can we focus on the love? / Paint my kiss across your chest / Be the art, I’ll be the brush.” A melody variation arrives in the Middle 8. Using a part of her voice that is seldom heard, Selena blasts, “Oh baby let’s make reality, actuality, a reality / Oh baby let’s make reality, actuality, a reality.” It’s well-constructed, perfect songwriting. You can “hear” the writing, the intent to be edgy. But for an artist like Gomez, who just needs to be shoe-horned into a hit and copy Micheal’s demo vocals, she has clearly found her dream team. Watch an exclusive #BadLiar Video on @Spotify Now. Link in bio. A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on May 17, 2017 at 9:05pm PDT All my feelings on fire… #BadLiarOutNow A post shared by Selena Gomez (@selenagomez) on May 17, 2017 at 9:07pm PDT If there’s a niggle with the official rolling out of “Bad Liar,” it’s Gomez’s decision (presumably with her team’s approval) not to remove her rehab bandaging and “Fall Risk” wristband from her single artwork photo shoot and music video, especially since the effect of that imagery is mixed up with bondage. Petra Collins — the photographer at Gomez’s post-rehab shoot — replied to an random Instagram user’s query about the bandaging with the following explanation. “Selena came straight from the hospital to this shoot—from being there for lupus,” Collins wrote. Is that satisfactory? Quite apart from the fact that the shoot and music video clearly didn’t have to be filmed on the same day that Selena left rehab, there is nothing in “Bad Liar’s” lyrics or subject matter that mentions or is enhanced by including the hospital items. Which raises motive questions as to why Gomez kept them on. Let us know your thoughts on Selena Gomez’s “Bad Liar” single and music video in the comments section below. [Featured Image C. Flanigan/Getty Images]

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